Address Unknown …

Address Unknown is raising money for the participative photography charity “PhotoVoice“. I submitted an image (along with hundreds of other photographers) – find it here, amongst all the others, some of which may be by really famous people (ooooooo how exciting!) and therefore worth a lot of money. You will only find out who took the photo after you have bought it!  Only £10.00 each – worth a punt!? All for charity …

Address Unknown – excerpt from the website: “There is a great revolution, thousands or even millions of people are going about taking photographs of what they notice and showing the world, whether to inspire, illuminate, educate, articulate, or just to somehow share how they feel – they are like Photo Postcards sent all over the world.

There are two women behind Address Unknown, both photographers in their own way, and friends. They have worked together on several projects with and for each other. They thought, “Wouldn’t it be lovely if there was a space for those photographs to be shown together, every picture sitting next to each other in equality no matter where they come from in the world, or who took them?”

An exhibition that would reveal the shared and the different experiences of our world’s cultures and environments. There could be great understanding leading to unexpected acts of kindness and gratitude and souls would dance for joy.

Melanie Gow is a mother, editor, author, filmmaker, writer, photographic artist, and cultural events organiser. Her father bought the brand new Pentax Asahi Spotmatic the year she was born. He handed her that camera when she was 6 years old and she had seen the world through a lens one way or another ever since. “I grew up watching him take endless pictures of our world – my life. It took his death for me to realise he didn’t just hand me a camera, he gave me the way I understand the world. Behind a lens I feel articulate. I barely think about it. It’s like breathing.”

Gill Aspel is a Fine Art, events and wedding photographer. As a young girl without a camera she would spend hours browsing through family photos asking who was who, and when and where such photos were taken – getting the story behind each one. “I remember the first time I wanted to become a photographer, I was working in Shanghai for three weeks and was astounded by the city – having forgotten my camera I decided to buy a few postcards. But they didn’t show what I saw. I realised that I needed a camera of my own and went out and bought one. I was then able to spend all my free time exploring the city and capturing it as I saw it.”

Address Unknown

Snapshot from the Address Unknown website

 

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